Nerdy Black Girl

notyourexrotic:


This week, India became the first Asian nation to reach Mars when its orbiter entered the planet’s orbit on Wednesday — and this is the picture that was seen around the world to mark this historic event. It shows a group of female scientists at the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) congratulating one another on the mission’s success. The picture was widely shared on Twitter where Egyptian journalist and women’s rights activist Mona El-Tahawy tweeted: “Love this pic so much. When was the last time u saw women scientists celebrate space mission?” In most mission room photos of historic space events or in films about space, women are rarely seen, making this photo both compelling and unique. Of course, ISRO, like many technical agencies, has far to go in terms of achieving gender balance in their workforce. As Rhitu Chatterjee of PRI’s The World observed in an op-ed, only 10 percent of ISRO’s engineers are female.This fact, however, Chatterjee writes, is “why this new photograph of ISRO’s women scientists is invaluable. It shatters stereotypes about space research and Indian women. It forces society to acknowledge and appreciate the accomplishments of female scientists. And for little girls and young women seeing the picture, I hope it will broaden their horizons, giving them more options for what they can pursue and achieve.” To read Chatterjee’s op-ed on The World, visit http://bit.ly/1u3fvGZPhoto credit: Manjunath Kiran/AFP/Getty Images

- A Mighty Girl
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notyourexrotic:

This week, India became the first Asian nation to reach Mars when its orbiter entered the planet’s orbit on Wednesday — and this is the picture that was seen around the world to mark this historic event. It shows a group of female scientists at the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) congratulating one another on the mission’s success. 

The picture was widely shared on Twitter where Egyptian journalist and women’s rights activist Mona El-Tahawy tweeted: “Love this pic so much. When was the last time u saw women scientists celebrate space mission?” 

In most mission room photos of historic space events or in films about space, women are rarely seen, making this photo both compelling and unique. Of course, ISRO, like many technical agencies, has far to go in terms of achieving gender balance in their workforce. As Rhitu Chatterjee of PRI’s The World observed in an op-ed, only 10 percent of ISRO’s engineers are female.

This fact, however, Chatterjee writes, is “why this new photograph of ISRO’s women scientists is invaluable. It shatters stereotypes about space research and Indian women. It forces society to acknowledge and appreciate the accomplishments of female scientists. And for little girls and young women seeing the picture, I hope it will broaden their horizons, giving them more options for what they can pursue and achieve.” 

To read Chatterjee’s op-ed on The World, visit http://bit.ly/1u3fvGZ

Photo credit: Manjunath Kiran/AFP/Getty Images

- A Mighty Girl


laboratoryequipment:

Einstein Hated Peer-review Process TooMost academic papers today are published only after some academic peers have had a chance to review the merits and limitations of the work. This seems like a good idea, but there is a growing movement that wants to retort, as Albert Einstein did, to such a review process.The academic review process was different in Einstein’s time. In his brilliant career, the only time his work was subjected to blind peer review – the authors don’t know the reviewers and vice versa – he showed contempt for what is now the gold standard of science. Was Einstein right to be so suspicious of the peer-review process? Should we learn from him and begin to question the widespread use of peer review in academic science?Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/einstein-hated-peer-review-process-too
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laboratoryequipment:

Einstein Hated Peer-review Process Too

Most academic papers today are published only after some academic peers have had a chance to review the merits and limitations of the work. This seems like a good idea, but there is a growing movement that wants to retort, as Albert Einstein did, to such a review process.

The academic review process was different in Einstein’s time. In his brilliant career, the only time his work was subjected to blind peer review – the authors don’t know the reviewers and vice versa – he showed contempt for what is now the gold standard of science. Was Einstein right to be so suspicious of the peer-review process? Should we learn from him and begin to question the widespread use of peer review in academic science?

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/einstein-hated-peer-review-process-too


ohscience:

thescienceofreality:

#YesAllWomen tweets reveal persistent sexism in science By Fiona MacDonald via ScienceAlert. | Image Credit: First three images via ScienceAlert via Twitter, fourth image via Twitter.

Reading through the tweets on the #yesallwomen hashtag is heartbreaking, illuminating and frustrating all at the same time. 
And if you’re a woman, you’ll be nodding along to nine out of 10 of them.
The hashtag started after it was revealed that 22-year-old Elliot Rodger, lead suspect in the Isla Vista shooting, had shared extremely disturbing and misogynistic views in a video posted shortly before the attack.
Instead of flooding the internet with Rodger-specific fury, Twitter took the discussion to the next level and remind the world that sexism is still very much present across society, and #YesAllWomen experience it.
Among those tweets were many honest and confronting admissions of sexism from female scientists, students and communicators.
This isn’t the first time the issue of misogyny in science has been brought up, but it’s always sad and shocking to see certain opinions persist when females have come such a long way in the field.
As ScienceAlert is staffed almost entirely by women, we though we’d add a few of our own:
Because only 44 out of 835 Nobel Prize laureates are women.
Because senior scientists would still rather hire males, and pay them more.
Because people are still shocked when we tell them ScienceAlert is run by women.

Because that last tweet I screenshotted, via Hannah Hart, really hits home for myself and so many women I’ve talked to over the last few days [much less ever] when it comes to pointing out sexism in general, especially within the STEM world. 

a break from our regular programming for some real important stuff
ohscience:

thescienceofreality:

#YesAllWomen tweets reveal persistent sexism in science By Fiona MacDonald via ScienceAlert. | Image Credit: First three images via ScienceAlert via Twitter, fourth image via Twitter.

Reading through the tweets on the #yesallwomen hashtag is heartbreaking, illuminating and frustrating all at the same time. 
And if you’re a woman, you’ll be nodding along to nine out of 10 of them.
The hashtag started after it was revealed that 22-year-old Elliot Rodger, lead suspect in the Isla Vista shooting, had shared extremely disturbing and misogynistic views in a video posted shortly before the attack.
Instead of flooding the internet with Rodger-specific fury, Twitter took the discussion to the next level and remind the world that sexism is still very much present across society, and #YesAllWomen experience it.
Among those tweets were many honest and confronting admissions of sexism from female scientists, students and communicators.
This isn’t the first time the issue of misogyny in science has been brought up, but it’s always sad and shocking to see certain opinions persist when females have come such a long way in the field.
As ScienceAlert is staffed almost entirely by women, we though we’d add a few of our own:
Because only 44 out of 835 Nobel Prize laureates are women.
Because senior scientists would still rather hire males, and pay them more.
Because people are still shocked when we tell them ScienceAlert is run by women.

Because that last tweet I screenshotted, via Hannah Hart, really hits home for myself and so many women I’ve talked to over the last few days [much less ever] when it comes to pointing out sexism in general, especially within the STEM world. 

a break from our regular programming for some real important stuff
ohscience:

thescienceofreality:

#YesAllWomen tweets reveal persistent sexism in science By Fiona MacDonald via ScienceAlert. | Image Credit: First three images via ScienceAlert via Twitter, fourth image via Twitter.

Reading through the tweets on the #yesallwomen hashtag is heartbreaking, illuminating and frustrating all at the same time. 
And if you’re a woman, you’ll be nodding along to nine out of 10 of them.
The hashtag started after it was revealed that 22-year-old Elliot Rodger, lead suspect in the Isla Vista shooting, had shared extremely disturbing and misogynistic views in a video posted shortly before the attack.
Instead of flooding the internet with Rodger-specific fury, Twitter took the discussion to the next level and remind the world that sexism is still very much present across society, and #YesAllWomen experience it.
Among those tweets were many honest and confronting admissions of sexism from female scientists, students and communicators.
This isn’t the first time the issue of misogyny in science has been brought up, but it’s always sad and shocking to see certain opinions persist when females have come such a long way in the field.
As ScienceAlert is staffed almost entirely by women, we though we’d add a few of our own:
Because only 44 out of 835 Nobel Prize laureates are women.
Because senior scientists would still rather hire males, and pay them more.
Because people are still shocked when we tell them ScienceAlert is run by women.

Because that last tweet I screenshotted, via Hannah Hart, really hits home for myself and so many women I’ve talked to over the last few days [much less ever] when it comes to pointing out sexism in general, especially within the STEM world. 

a break from our regular programming for some real important stuff
ohscience:

thescienceofreality:

#YesAllWomen tweets reveal persistent sexism in science By Fiona MacDonald via ScienceAlert. | Image Credit: First three images via ScienceAlert via Twitter, fourth image via Twitter.

Reading through the tweets on the #yesallwomen hashtag is heartbreaking, illuminating and frustrating all at the same time. 
And if you’re a woman, you’ll be nodding along to nine out of 10 of them.
The hashtag started after it was revealed that 22-year-old Elliot Rodger, lead suspect in the Isla Vista shooting, had shared extremely disturbing and misogynistic views in a video posted shortly before the attack.
Instead of flooding the internet with Rodger-specific fury, Twitter took the discussion to the next level and remind the world that sexism is still very much present across society, and #YesAllWomen experience it.
Among those tweets were many honest and confronting admissions of sexism from female scientists, students and communicators.
This isn’t the first time the issue of misogyny in science has been brought up, but it’s always sad and shocking to see certain opinions persist when females have come such a long way in the field.
As ScienceAlert is staffed almost entirely by women, we though we’d add a few of our own:
Because only 44 out of 835 Nobel Prize laureates are women.
Because senior scientists would still rather hire males, and pay them more.
Because people are still shocked when we tell them ScienceAlert is run by women.

Because that last tweet I screenshotted, via Hannah Hart, really hits home for myself and so many women I’ve talked to over the last few days [much less ever] when it comes to pointing out sexism in general, especially within the STEM world. 

a break from our regular programming for some real important stuff

ohscience:

thescienceofreality:

#YesAllWomen tweets reveal persistent sexism in science By Fiona MacDonald via ScienceAlert. | Image Credit: First three images via ScienceAlert via Twitter, fourth image via Twitter.

Reading through the tweets on the #yesallwomen hashtag is heartbreaking, illuminating and frustrating all at the same time. 

And if you’re a woman, you’ll be nodding along to nine out of 10 of them.

The hashtag started after it was revealed that 22-year-old Elliot Rodger, lead suspect in the Isla Vista shooting, had shared extremely disturbing and misogynistic views in a video posted shortly before the attack.

Instead of flooding the internet with Rodger-specific fury, Twitter took the discussion to the next level and remind the world that sexism is still very much present across society, and #YesAllWomen experience it.

Among those tweets were many honest and confronting admissions of sexism from female scientists, students and communicators.

This isn’t the first time the issue of misogyny in science has been brought up, but it’s always sad and shocking to see certain opinions persist when females have come such a long way in the field.

As ScienceAlert is staffed almost entirely by women, we though we’d add a few of our own:

Because only 44 out of 835 Nobel Prize laureates are women.

Because senior scientists would still rather hire males, and pay them more.

Because people are still shocked when we tell them ScienceAlert is run by women.

Because that last tweet I screenshotted, via Hannah Hart, really hits home for myself and so many women I’ve talked to over the last few days [much less ever] when it comes to pointing out sexism in general, especially within the STEM world. 

a break from our regular programming for some real important stuff


How can I respond to people who get mad because POC get scholarships related to their race? A lot of my white friends are angry because according to them "white people have to work hard to get to college but POC (they usually use more derogatory terms though) get everything handed to them" and I don't know how to explain to them why they're wrong. from lusitanoqueen

fyeahcracker:

Well you can hit them with some facts

  • More Evidence That Colleges Are Giving Money to Those Who Need It Least Scholarships are more generous for wealthier families

  • this post is helpful so is this charts and information here
  • "Caucasian students receive more than three-quarters (76%) of all institutional merit-based scholarship and grant funding, even though they represent less than two-thirds (62%) of the student population. Caucasian students are 40% more likely to win private scholarships than minority students. These statistics demonstrate that, as a whole, private sector scholarship programs tend to perpetuate historical inequities in the distribution of scholarships according to race." —  The Distribution of Grants and Scholarships by Race Source
  • SoLDN: “Caucasian students are 40% more likely to win private scholarships than minority students.  ”

    [SOURCE]

  • Another post going in

  • Entire Archived “Affirmative Action” tag
  • Reverse racism is not a thing and doesn’t exist
  • Entire Affirmative Action Tag Discrediting That
    1. When some white college applicants wonder if they are not getting into competitive schools, because so many of the spaces go to minorities, they are connecting their individual experience up with a conception of the larger social structure… When you look at the data, you will realize that it is absolutely impossible for most college rejections to be due to affirmative action.

      — (Giddens 5)

    • Hard Truths: Affirmative Action  — (racismschool)
    • Ten myths about affirmative action
    • "Why is it people always get so upset about Affirmative Action but not about legacies? For some reason we’re ok with the historically advantaged having a leg-up over the rest of us, but not the historically disenfranchise" — (bohemianarthouse)
    • Your friends are attributing a lack of merit to People of Color. They’re assuming we have no capability of earning anything and that we just get everything as undeserved handouts that are for no reason. They’re actually a direct reaction to very recent and still presently continuing active disenfranchising discriminatory racist legislation and entire systems and structures in unfair bias and benefit towards white people that have existed for centuries and are not being dismantled as years continue

    Where’s your friend’s complaint about that..? Where’s your friend’s complaint about how all the white people my dad’s age had unfair access to schools over Black people while Black people were fighting for civil rights legislation and had to leave school to protest to have their humanity recognized?

    Why isn’t your friend upset about my parents having dogs sicked on them by the police and having the Police commissioner drive through their neighborhood in a military tank to instill fear in Black people? Why isn’t your friend mad that my parents were the group of the first Black kids to go to their high schools and how much of an extreme unfair advantage that meant for the white students over my Black parents..?

    How do people forget history so quickly…?

    The breakdown of who gets scholarships are as follows:


    White: Scholarship Recipients-798,400 Total Private Scholarship Funding-$1,891 Million
    Black: Scholarship Recipients-129,000 Total Private Scholarship Funding-$345 Million
    Latino: Scholarship Recipients-103,900 Total Private Scholarship Funding-$236 Million
    Asian: Scholarship Recipients-52,800 Total Private Scholarship Funding-$186 Million
    American Indian: Scholarship Recipients-19,000 Total Private Scholarship Funding-$56 Million
    Native Hawaiian: Scholarship Recipients-6,200 Total Private Scholarship Funding-$30 Million
    Multi-Racial: Scholarship Recipients-40,200 Total Private Scholarship Funding-$156 Million

    So my question is, why are white people getting scholarships just for being white? Right after you answer that, please tell me why white people are getting MORE MONEY on their scholarships just for being white? Seems unfair. We have to stop this affirmative action. (Oh and just in case you’re all people who see a Tumblr post and REFUSE to see the source within that post, here is where those numbers came from: Bloop! Bloop!)

    — Racismschool (From This Post)

    • It’s so bizarre how when Affirmative Action is brought up, it more often then not ALWAYS leads to this specific dichotomy between the capable white person vs. an incapable minority - and it’s always this comparison. ( reverseracism )
    — Source : (full video) — commie-pinko-liberal
  • When some white college applicants wonder if they are not getting into competitive schools, because so many of the spaces go to minorities, they are connecting their individual experience up with a conception of the larger social structure… When you look at the data, you will realize that it is absolutely impossible for most college rejections to be due to affirmative action.

    — (Giddens 5)


knowledgeequalsblackpower:

Fathers of Technology and Innovation
Clarence “Skip” Ellis was the first African-American to earn a PhD in Computer Science. He helped develop the concept of clicking icons which lead to the development of user friendly operating systems such as Windows or Mac. 
David Hedgley created a mathmatical algorithim that would tell computers which lines to display and which lines to make invisible, thus creating 3-D graphics. 
James E. West holds 47 U.S. and more than 200 foreign patents. He is best known for co-inventing the electroacoustic transducer, an electret microphone that revolutionized microphones and is used in 90% of microphones today (including in telephones, tape recorders, and other devices). 
Mark Dean developed a number of landmark technologies for IBM, including the color PC monitor and the first gigahertz chip. He holds three of the company’s original nine patents with more than 20 patents associated with his name. He also co-invented the Industry Standard Architecture system bus allowing for computer plug-ins such as disk drives, modems, and printers.
Marc Hannah co-founded SGI (Silicon Graphics, Inc.) and was named its principal scientist for inventing computer graphic programs like Personal IRIS, Indigo, Indigo2, and Indy graphics, which were used to create effects for commercials, television shows, films (like Jurassic Park and Terminator 2). engineering, research, and for military applications. Hannah is also the chief technology officer for SongPro, a technology company specializing in making multimedia plug-ins used for listening to music on hand-held video game players and MP3 players.
Gerald Lawson invented the modern game console, the first home video game system with interchangeable game cartridges. 
knowledgeequalsblackpower:

Fathers of Technology and Innovation
Clarence “Skip” Ellis was the first African-American to earn a PhD in Computer Science. He helped develop the concept of clicking icons which lead to the development of user friendly operating systems such as Windows or Mac. 
David Hedgley created a mathmatical algorithim that would tell computers which lines to display and which lines to make invisible, thus creating 3-D graphics. 
James E. West holds 47 U.S. and more than 200 foreign patents. He is best known for co-inventing the electroacoustic transducer, an electret microphone that revolutionized microphones and is used in 90% of microphones today (including in telephones, tape recorders, and other devices). 
Mark Dean developed a number of landmark technologies for IBM, including the color PC monitor and the first gigahertz chip. He holds three of the company’s original nine patents with more than 20 patents associated with his name. He also co-invented the Industry Standard Architecture system bus allowing for computer plug-ins such as disk drives, modems, and printers.
Marc Hannah co-founded SGI (Silicon Graphics, Inc.) and was named its principal scientist for inventing computer graphic programs like Personal IRIS, Indigo, Indigo2, and Indy graphics, which were used to create effects for commercials, television shows, films (like Jurassic Park and Terminator 2). engineering, research, and for military applications. Hannah is also the chief technology officer for SongPro, a technology company specializing in making multimedia plug-ins used for listening to music on hand-held video game players and MP3 players.
Gerald Lawson invented the modern game console, the first home video game system with interchangeable game cartridges. 
knowledgeequalsblackpower:

Fathers of Technology and Innovation
Clarence “Skip” Ellis was the first African-American to earn a PhD in Computer Science. He helped develop the concept of clicking icons which lead to the development of user friendly operating systems such as Windows or Mac. 
David Hedgley created a mathmatical algorithim that would tell computers which lines to display and which lines to make invisible, thus creating 3-D graphics. 
James E. West holds 47 U.S. and more than 200 foreign patents. He is best known for co-inventing the electroacoustic transducer, an electret microphone that revolutionized microphones and is used in 90% of microphones today (including in telephones, tape recorders, and other devices). 
Mark Dean developed a number of landmark technologies for IBM, including the color PC monitor and the first gigahertz chip. He holds three of the company’s original nine patents with more than 20 patents associated with his name. He also co-invented the Industry Standard Architecture system bus allowing for computer plug-ins such as disk drives, modems, and printers.
Marc Hannah co-founded SGI (Silicon Graphics, Inc.) and was named its principal scientist for inventing computer graphic programs like Personal IRIS, Indigo, Indigo2, and Indy graphics, which were used to create effects for commercials, television shows, films (like Jurassic Park and Terminator 2). engineering, research, and for military applications. Hannah is also the chief technology officer for SongPro, a technology company specializing in making multimedia plug-ins used for listening to music on hand-held video game players and MP3 players.
Gerald Lawson invented the modern game console, the first home video game system with interchangeable game cartridges. 
knowledgeequalsblackpower:

Fathers of Technology and Innovation
Clarence “Skip” Ellis was the first African-American to earn a PhD in Computer Science. He helped develop the concept of clicking icons which lead to the development of user friendly operating systems such as Windows or Mac. 
David Hedgley created a mathmatical algorithim that would tell computers which lines to display and which lines to make invisible, thus creating 3-D graphics. 
James E. West holds 47 U.S. and more than 200 foreign patents. He is best known for co-inventing the electroacoustic transducer, an electret microphone that revolutionized microphones and is used in 90% of microphones today (including in telephones, tape recorders, and other devices). 
Mark Dean developed a number of landmark technologies for IBM, including the color PC monitor and the first gigahertz chip. He holds three of the company’s original nine patents with more than 20 patents associated with his name. He also co-invented the Industry Standard Architecture system bus allowing for computer plug-ins such as disk drives, modems, and printers.
Marc Hannah co-founded SGI (Silicon Graphics, Inc.) and was named its principal scientist for inventing computer graphic programs like Personal IRIS, Indigo, Indigo2, and Indy graphics, which were used to create effects for commercials, television shows, films (like Jurassic Park and Terminator 2). engineering, research, and for military applications. Hannah is also the chief technology officer for SongPro, a technology company specializing in making multimedia plug-ins used for listening to music on hand-held video game players and MP3 players.
Gerald Lawson invented the modern game console, the first home video game system with interchangeable game cartridges. 
knowledgeequalsblackpower:

Fathers of Technology and Innovation
Clarence “Skip” Ellis was the first African-American to earn a PhD in Computer Science. He helped develop the concept of clicking icons which lead to the development of user friendly operating systems such as Windows or Mac. 
David Hedgley created a mathmatical algorithim that would tell computers which lines to display and which lines to make invisible, thus creating 3-D graphics. 
James E. West holds 47 U.S. and more than 200 foreign patents. He is best known for co-inventing the electroacoustic transducer, an electret microphone that revolutionized microphones and is used in 90% of microphones today (including in telephones, tape recorders, and other devices). 
Mark Dean developed a number of landmark technologies for IBM, including the color PC monitor and the first gigahertz chip. He holds three of the company’s original nine patents with more than 20 patents associated with his name. He also co-invented the Industry Standard Architecture system bus allowing for computer plug-ins such as disk drives, modems, and printers.
Marc Hannah co-founded SGI (Silicon Graphics, Inc.) and was named its principal scientist for inventing computer graphic programs like Personal IRIS, Indigo, Indigo2, and Indy graphics, which were used to create effects for commercials, television shows, films (like Jurassic Park and Terminator 2). engineering, research, and for military applications. Hannah is also the chief technology officer for SongPro, a technology company specializing in making multimedia plug-ins used for listening to music on hand-held video game players and MP3 players.
Gerald Lawson invented the modern game console, the first home video game system with interchangeable game cartridges. 
knowledgeequalsblackpower:

Fathers of Technology and Innovation
Clarence “Skip” Ellis was the first African-American to earn a PhD in Computer Science. He helped develop the concept of clicking icons which lead to the development of user friendly operating systems such as Windows or Mac. 
David Hedgley created a mathmatical algorithim that would tell computers which lines to display and which lines to make invisible, thus creating 3-D graphics. 
James E. West holds 47 U.S. and more than 200 foreign patents. He is best known for co-inventing the electroacoustic transducer, an electret microphone that revolutionized microphones and is used in 90% of microphones today (including in telephones, tape recorders, and other devices). 
Mark Dean developed a number of landmark technologies for IBM, including the color PC monitor and the first gigahertz chip. He holds three of the company’s original nine patents with more than 20 patents associated with his name. He also co-invented the Industry Standard Architecture system bus allowing for computer plug-ins such as disk drives, modems, and printers.
Marc Hannah co-founded SGI (Silicon Graphics, Inc.) and was named its principal scientist for inventing computer graphic programs like Personal IRIS, Indigo, Indigo2, and Indy graphics, which were used to create effects for commercials, television shows, films (like Jurassic Park and Terminator 2). engineering, research, and for military applications. Hannah is also the chief technology officer for SongPro, a technology company specializing in making multimedia plug-ins used for listening to music on hand-held video game players and MP3 players.
Gerald Lawson invented the modern game console, the first home video game system with interchangeable game cartridges. 

knowledgeequalsblackpower:

Fathers of Technology and Innovation

  • Clarence “Skip” Ellis was the first African-American to earn a PhD in Computer Science. He helped develop the concept of clicking icons which lead to the development of user friendly operating systems such as Windows or Mac. 
  • David Hedgley created a mathmatical algorithim that would tell computers which lines to display and which lines to make invisible, thus creating 3-D graphics. 
  • James E. West holds 47 U.S. and more than 200 foreign patents. He is best known for co-inventing the electroacoustic transducer, an electret microphone that revolutionized microphones and is used in 90% of microphones today (including in telephones, tape recorders, and other devices). 
  • Mark Dean developed a number of landmark technologies for IBM, including the color PC monitor and the first gigahertz chip. He holds three of the company’s original nine patents with more than 20 patents associated with his name. He also co-invented the Industry Standard Architecture system bus allowing for computer plug-ins such as disk drives, modems, and printers.
  • Marc Hannah co-founded SGI (Silicon Graphics, Inc.) and was named its principal scientist for inventing computer graphic programs like Personal IRIS, Indigo, Indigo2, and Indy graphics, which were used to create effects for commercials, television shows, films (like Jurassic Park and Terminator 2). engineering, research, and for military applications. Hannah is also the chief technology officer for SongPro, a technology company specializing in making multimedia plug-ins used for listening to music on hand-held video game players and MP3 players.
  • Gerald Lawson invented the modern game console, the first home video game system with interchangeable game cartridges. 

doctorbee:

xwidep:

Scales

This is because Fahrenheit is based on a brine scale and the human body. The scale is basically how cold does it have to be to freeze saltwater (zero Fahrenheit) to what temperature is the human body (100-ish Fahrenheit, although now we know that’s not exactly accurate). Fahrenheit was designed around humans.Celsius and Kelvin are designed around the natural world.Celsius is a scale based on water. Zero is when water freezes, 100 is when water boils.Kelvin uses the same scale as Celsius (one degree, as a unit, is the same between the two), but defines zero as absolute zero, which is basically the temperature at which atoms literally stop doing that spinning thing. Nothing can exist below zero Kelvin. It’s the bottom of the scale.So.Fahrenheit: what temperatures affect humansCelsius: what temperatures affect waterKelvin: what temperatures affect atoms

doctorbee:

xwidep:

Scales

This is because Fahrenheit is based on a brine scale and the human body. The scale is basically how cold does it have to be to freeze saltwater (zero Fahrenheit) to what temperature is the human body (100-ish Fahrenheit, although now we know that’s not exactly accurate). Fahrenheit was designed around humans.

Celsius and Kelvin are designed around the natural world.

Celsius is a scale based on water. Zero is when water freezes, 100 is when water boils.

Kelvin uses the same scale as Celsius (one degree, as a unit, is the same between the two), but defines zero as absolute zero, which is basically the temperature at which atoms literally stop doing that spinning thing. Nothing can exist below zero Kelvin. It’s the bottom of the scale.

So.
Fahrenheit: what temperatures affect humans
Celsius: what temperatures affect water
Kelvin: what temperatures affect atoms